YES! Having your hearing tested regularly can significantly reduce the chances of causing any long-term effects. Not getting tested is the main factor for damaged hearing across all of North Carolina.

With the rise of electronic usage, our hearing is more at risk than ever. You may have already noticed some signs depending on your age and/or occupation. Here’s what you need to know about hearing assessments and when to get them.

What Are The Signs?

Often, people are very conscious of their hearing and see it as an embarrassment when experiencing issues.

This way of thinking can lead to more debilitating issues and can also produce irreversible problems. If you or a loved one experiences any of the following symptoms, then it’s time to schedule a hearing assessment. 

  • Everyday life is affected – Having to ask someone to repeat themselves constantly is the first sign of hearing loss. It is often overcome by reading lips or picking up on social cues (e.g., laughing because everyone else is laughing). Turning up the volume on the TV/radio or being on a phone call and complaining that the volume doesn’t go loud enough are early signs of issues.
  • Social Settings – Being out in public becomes increasingly difficult for a person with a hearing loss. The mixture of various sounds, such as in restaurants, at sporting events, at large gatherings, or even multiple voices, can overtake the sound of normal conversation depending on the severity of the damage.
  • Seclusion – It is not uncommon for people to experience anxiety from misunderstanding things that were once clear to them. This results in the person isolating themselves and avoiding certain settings where they will feel left out. It’s easier and more comfortable to stay home because if there is nothing to hear, any hearing problems are not noticeable.

Why You Should Get An Assessment

Monitoring your hearing can prevent many long-term issues and, at the very least, will improve your day-to-day life.

The long-term effects stem from neglect and, in most cases, can be prevented. More serious issues can even affect other health areas, including cognitive function, dementia, and even early onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Getting an assessment done as early as possible makes it easier for professionals to identify a hearing loss. As we age, our hearing ability naturally declines, and by having a benchmark set, predicting the rate of depletion is more probable.

Addressing hearing problems early on will ensure a higher rate of success at a minimal cost. The longer a problem has had a chance to set in, the harder it becomes to treat and live with. The easiest way to avoid this pitfall is to have assessments done early.

However, if you have never had a test done before, it’s never too late to start. The sooner your audiologist identifies your issues, the sooner they can get to work on improving your hearing and your life.

What is a Hearing Assessment?

A hearing assessment is a quick and painless way to monitor your hearing and prevent or treat any underlying issues. They are non-invasive and can be scheduled online.

Aim Hearing & Audiology Services is dedicated to raising awareness of the benefits of regular checkups. The assessment lasts roughly 45 minutes, and the results are provided to you instantaneously. 

Bookings are available online here.

Aim Hearing & Audiology Services takes every precaution and follows all of the COVID prevention protocols to ensure all patient’s and staff’s safety.

If you or a loved one cannot attend in person, Aim Hearing & Audiology Services also offers Tele Audiology. This is the same procedure but from the comfort of your own home. You will speak face-to-face with one of our audiologists, who will immediately administer the test and provide your results.

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Dr. Shannon Frymark Au.D., CCC-A

Shannon Frymark, Au.D., CCC-A, audiologist, received her doctor of audiology degree from the School of Audiology at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and her master’s degree from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. She is licensed by the state of North Carolina, earned her certificate of clinical competency (CCC-A) from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, is a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology, and is a member of the North Carolina Speech, Hearing & Language Association as well as the Hearing Loss Association of America.